RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 18
TI Guest Editors' Introduction: Intelligent Transportation and Pervasive Computing
A1 Liviu Iftode,
A1 Keith I. Farkas,
A1 John Heidemann,
K1 intelligent transportation
K1 vehicular computing
K1 pervasive computing
K1 mobile computing
K1 intelligent vehicular transportation
AB This special issue samples the developing area of pervasive computing in transportation systems through four feature articles and the Spotlight department, which consists of two interviews and two short articles. These contributions were written by automotive industry and academic experts and provide a diversity of views on a range of topics. Although the contributions focus on intelligent vehicular transportation, the technologies discussed also have applications in other transportation systems. This article is part of a special issue on Intelligent Transportation.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.71
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.71

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 47
TI Scalable, Distributed, Real-Time Map Generation
A1 Alastair R. Beresford,
A1 Jonathan J. Davies,
A1 Andy Hopper,
K1 mobile computing
K1 distributed systems
K1 algorithm/protocol design and analysis
K1 architectures
K1 distributed applications
AB With the advent of vehicles with sufficient computing power and communications capabilities, a range of new applications involving many vehicles are becoming feasible. These applications will involve the large-scale collection, processing, and dissemination of data, in which vehicles could participate as the sources, processors, and sinks. One such application is the automatic generation of up-to-date digital road maps based on the collection and processing of vehicles' location data. However, deploying such an application will involve several challenges and issues, including the choice of architecture to support it.This article is part of a special issue on Intelligent Transportation.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.83
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.83

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 38
TI Enhancing Security and Privacy in Traffic-Monitoring Systems
A1 Hui Xiong,
A1 Baik Hoh,
A1 Marco Gruteser,
A1 Ansaf Alrabady,
K1 security
K1 data integrity
K1 privacy
K1 traffic monitoring systems
K1 clustering
AB Future traffic-monitoring applications will be able to collect location traces from numerous GPS-equipped probe vehicles. This article discusses the privacy and data integrity challenges that this approach raises and presents an overview of architectural and algorithmic solutions. The proposed architecture splits communication and data analysis functions, thereby addressing privacy by separating data and identities. The authors also show that anonymous location samples stored in a database still let data mining algorithms reconstruct private information, such as home locations. Thus, a complete solution requires data suppression techniques to reduce these risks in addition to the proposed architecture. This article is part of a special issue on Intelligent Transportation.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.69
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.69

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 4
TI Are We There Yet?
A1 Roy Want,
K1 Intelligent Transportation
AB Electronic entertainment systems have been a considerable boon to helping alleviate the dull side of travel: for a long time, cars have been equipped with radios or cassette players, and commercial airplanes have provided audio programming and a limited selection of movies. Over the past 10 years, pervasive computing technologies have contributed to mobile entertainment's evolving capabilities. Reflecting on this evolution for some of the most popular forms of transportation reveals that although there were initially few improvements, capabilities are now improving at a breakneck pace. This department is part of a special issue on Intelligent Transportation.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.66
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.66

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 63
TI Intelligent Transportation Systems
A1 Jie Sun,
A1 Zhaohui Wu,
A1 Alastair R. Beresford,
A1 Haitao Guo,
A1 David N. Cottingham,
A1 Yong Lin,
A1 Jonathan J. Davies,
A1 Muhammad Khurram Khan,
A1 Wei Guan,
A1 Jiashu Zhang,
A1 Bernhard Lamprecht,
A1 Kyandoghere Kyamakya,
A1 Liviu Iftode,
A1 Gang Pan,
A1 Guoqing Yang,
A1 Simone Fuchs,
A1 Juan Carlos Yelmo Garc?,
A1 Milind Nimesh,
A1 Jean Bacon,
A1 Yod Samuel Mart? Garc?,
A1 Houbing Song,
A1 Anthony D. Joseph,
A1 Brian D. Jones,
A1 Jorge de Gracia Santos,
A1 Jian Lu,
A1 Qing Wu,
A1 Zhenyu Shan,
A1 Jorge Gonz?lez Fern?ndez,
K1 intelligent transportation
K1 sentient transport
K1 traffic estimation
K1 context-aware machine vision
K1 railway vehicles
K1 smart automobiles
K1 identity verification
AB This Works in Progress department discusses 10 ongoing intelligent transportation systems projects. TIME, Sentient Transport, Electric-Vehicle Terminal, DynaChina, and TrafficView focus on traffic and vehicular data collection, transmission, and analysis. Other projects aim to provide intelligent-copilot services for drivers; focus on asset identification and data collection for railroad environments; are building application development environments for automobiles; and are designing a multimodal biometric identification system for travel documents. This department is part of a special issue on Intelligent Transportation.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.77
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.77

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 68
TI Smart Cars on Smart Roads: An IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Society Update
A1 Liuqing Yang,
A1 Fei-Yue Wang,
A1 Daniel Zeng,
K1 ITSS
K1 intelligent transportation systems
AB To promote tighter collaboration between the IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Society and the pervasive computing research community, the authors introduce the ITS Society and present several pervasive computing-related research topics that ITS Society researchers are working on. This department is part of a special issue on Intelligent Transportation.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.84
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.84

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 12
TI New Products
A1 Keith Farkas,
A1 Eyal de Lara,
K1 IntelliOne Technologies
K1 Ngrain R-PDA
K1 One Laptop Per Child
K1 $100 laptop
K1 Green WiFi
K1 Sony MEX-BT5000
K1 Ballbot
K1 Hewlett-Packard Labs Memory Spot
AB In this issue, editors Eyal de Lara and Keith Farkas review two products that enhance vehicular transportation: a Bluetooth audio head unit that seamlessly integrates with mobile phones and a system that uses mobile phone network usage data to determine average traffic speeds and areas of congestion. They also report on a laptop and related WiFi technology that significantly lower the barriers to such technologies' use in developing countries, a device that helps soldiers disarm landmines, a robot that moves on a ball, and a tiny self-contained wireless chip.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.79
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.79

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 55
TI Vehicular Communication
A1 Keith I. Farkas,
A1 Markus Strassberger,
A1 Timo Kosch,
A1 Hideki Hada,
A1 Lorenzo Caminiti,
A1 Derek Caveney,
A1 Ken Laberteaux,
A1 John Heidemann,
A1 Liviu Iftode,
K1 intelligent transportation
AB Researchers in both academia and industry are increasingly interested in vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication, because they enable numerous safety systems and end-user applications. To gain a better understanding of vehicular communication, we solicited input from experts, interviewing Wieland Holfelder, vice president and chief technology officer of DaimlerChrysler Research and Technology North America, and Jean-Pierre Hubaux, a professor of communication systems at the École Polytechnique Fédéral de Lausanne. We also received short articles from Timo Kosch and Markus Strassberger of BWM Group Research and Technology and from Ken Laberteaux, Lorenzo Caminiti, Derek Caveney, and Hideki Hada of Toyota. Collectively, these four pieces indicate a growing momentum in vehicular communication, although many open questions remain. This department is part of a special issue on Intelligent Transportation.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.90
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.90

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 86
TI Accessible Ultrasonic Positioning
A1 Michael McCarthy,
A1 Henk L. Muller,
A1 Cliff Randell,
A1 Paul Duff,
K1 ultrasonics
K1 positioning systems
K1 wearable computing
AB Indoor positioning systems haven't been readily accessible outside the realms of industrial research and academia. One reason is that positioning technologies have been too expensive and complex for the inexperienced user. The development of inexpensive, easy-to-use positioning technology should make the deployment of location-based applications easier for ubiquitous-systems designers.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.65
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.65

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 102
TI HotMobile 2006: Mobile Computing Practitioners Interact
A1 Maria R. Ebling,
K1 mobile computing
K1 HotMobile 2006
K1 mobile phones
K1 cell phones
K1 localization
K1 presence sharing
AB Like the First IEEE Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications, held in 1994, the 2006 workshop aimed to foster interaction between mobile computing practitioners. In keeping with this goal, we returned to a small, informal workshop with few papers but significant discussions. We accepted just nine papers, but we had two important group discussions, two exciting panels, and an insightful keynote address. To reflect these changes, the steering committee changed the nickname of this year's workshop to HotMobile 2006. Approximately 40 people attended the two-day event, held at the Semiahmoo resort in Blaine, Washington.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.72
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.72

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 15
TI Pervasive Direct Brain Interfaces
A1 Melody Moore Jackson,
K1 direct brain interface
K1 field potential
K1 electroencephalography
K1 neural prosthetics
K1 assistive technology
AB Direct brain interfaces can detect minute changes in the brain?s physical properties, such as electrophysiological signals or blood oxygenation. Unlike traditional input devices, DBIs can provide control channels that do not depend on muscle movement. Researchers are hopeful that DBIs will provide assistive technologies for people with severe physical disabilities.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.80
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.80

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 78
TI Ultrawideband as an Industrial Wireless Solution
A1 Ben Allen,
A1 Gerhard P. Hancke,
K1 ultrawideband
K1 wireless
K1 industrial environment
K1 sensor networks
K1 localization
AB Ultrawideband wireless technology is capable of transmitting data at very high rates, over a wide frequency spectrum, with very low power consumption. UWB also offers precision location positioning and tracking, significantly expanding its potential application. UWB technology's unique characteristics make it a more suitable solution than narrow-band wireless systems for meeting wireless needs in the industrial environment.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.89
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.89

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 94
TI Mobile Local Macropayments: Security and Prototyping
A1 Gianluigi Me,
A1 Alexander Schuster,
A1 Maurizio Adriano Strangio,
K1 personal trusted device
K1 security
K1 payment
K1 handheld
K1 ECIES
K1 Java
AB Mobile devices might soon be the most popular payment mechanism for electronic payments and, therefore, the perfect candidate for a personal trusted device. An electronic payment system (such as credit card networks) can perform e-payments by extending payment transactions to the handheld device. The need for security services, such as authentication, confidentiality, integrity, and nonrepudiation is paramount because heterogeneous wireless network technologies such as personal area networks, local area networks, and wide area networks have both well-known and yet-undiscovered security weaknesses. A Java-based, secure local macropayment system prototype retrieves electronic checks from a bank and uses them to pay vendors for goods and services, with different interaction levels at the point of sale.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.78
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.78

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 7
TI Podcasting 101: What the Web's New Trend Means to You
A1 Laurianne McLaughlin,
K1 podcasting
K1 audioblogging
K1 Haptics
AB First, the phenomenon of blogging changed the rules for online publishing: Now, podcasting has opened the world of online broadcasting to anyone with a PC, a microphone, and a Net connection. But podcasting isn?t just for fun and games. Plenty of podcasts focus on music, talk-radio style banter and humor, but podcasts also now serve key purposes for news organizations, businesses, even politicians trying to connect with voters. Furthermore, they?re making news in education, especially in universities with the resources and funding to support early applications. Also in this issue: "Bringing Haptics to Consumers," by Jan Krikke.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.81
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.81

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 70
TI Rapid Feedback Systems for Elite Sports Training
A1 Arnold Baca,
A1 Philipp Kornfeind,
K1 Feedback systems
K1 coaching
K1 skill acquisition
K1 training
AB Sports-specific feedback systems are becoming an essential part of elite sports training. Various sensors are embedded in the sport equipment, the environment, or attached to the athlete. Mobile computers acquire the relevant data and present feedback information to coaches and athletes. To be most effective, feedback should be given shortly after motion execution. Several feedback systems used in rowing, table tennis, and biathlon offer examples practical examples and illustrate principles developers should observe when constructing such systems.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.82
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.82

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 20
TI The Last Inch at 70 Miles Per Hour
A1 Tj Giuli,
A1 K. Venkatesh Prasad,
A1 David Watson,
K1 automotive software architecture
K1 security
K1 reliability
K1 service-oriented architecture
K1 human-machine interface
AB The telecommunications industry has made great strides toward solving the last-mile problem in delivering Internet services to consumers. However, considerable challenges remain in solving the last-inch problem: delivering services from vehicle-based computers to their drivers and passengers. Effectively solving this problem requires careful computing, communications, and cognitive design to contend with the automotive domain's significant safety issues and resource constraints. Such constraints dictate small displays for users who might be interacting with applications while driving at highway speeds. This article examines last-inch challenges through the lens of the nonfunctional requirements security, privacy, usability, and reliability (SPUR). It also presents a service-oriented middleware solution and describes its implementation in a demonstration vehicle. This article is part of a special issue on Intelligent Transportation.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.86
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.86

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 106
TI 2006 Annual Index
K1
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.64
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.64

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Pervasive Computing
YR 2006
VO 5
IS
SP 28
TI Turn-Intent Analysis Using Body Pose for Intelligent Driver Assistance
A1 Mohan Manubhai Trivedi,
A1 Shinko Yuanhsien Cheng,
K1 Pervasive computing
K1 computer vision
K1 transportation
K1 face and gesture recognition
K1 pattern recognition applications
AB Pervasive computing technologies hold much promise for enhancing automotive safety by introducing a new range of human-centered driver assistance systems. Requirements for designing an active safety system are accurately, reliably, and quickly identifying the conditions leading to an accident and inducing corrective actions to prevent the accident. The authors propose a driver turn-maneuver prediction system using a two-class pattern classification algorithm using driver-pose and steering-angle information. They analyze classifier-detection performance using receiver-operator-characteristic curves. These curves provide a picture of the attainable proactivity versus transparency ratios, pertaining to a pervasive computing system's ability to foresee the user's needs as compared to the system's ability not to annoy the user. The goal is to motivate the development of both vision-based body-pose recovery and behavior recognition algorithms for driver assistance systems. This article is part of a special issue on Intelligent Transportation.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1536-1268
LA English
DO 10.1109/MPRV.2006.88
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MPRV.2006.88