RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS 3
SP 3
TI Editorial Board
AB Lists the editorial board of this publication.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.42
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.42

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 2
TI From the Editor's Desk
A1 Jeffrey R. Yost,
K1 history of computer games
K1 history of videogames
K1 game platforms
K1 TV
K1 video engineering
AB Computer games and the gaming industry are a major cultural and economic force throughout the world. This issue of IEEE Annals is not only among the first collections of quality scholarship on the history of computer games, it is international in scope, offering analyses from both sides of the Atlantic.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.44
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.44

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 4
TI Guest Editor's Introduction: Perspectives on the History of Computer Games
K1 computer games
K1 video games
K1 Brian Sutton-Smith
K1 Henry Lowood
AB <p>[I]t is probable, but not proven, that play at video games accustoms the player to the kind of activity that computers also require. One must sit down in front of a computer-like object and manage it in much the same way by levers and controls that a computer is managed. As in the case of the computer, there is immediate feedback for right and wrong choices. The management system of both game and computer are thus similar. It would be surprising if skill at one did not transfer to skill at the other; or if the attitude of being at ease with one did not transfer to being at ease with the other. (pp. 73&#x2013;74)<ref type="bib" rid="bibman20090300041">1</ref></p><p align="right">&#x2014;Brian Sutton-Smith</p>
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.47
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.47

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 5
TI Videogames in Computer Space: The Complex History of Pong
A1 Henry Lowood,
K1 Keywords: history of computing; videogames; computer games; television engineering; Pong; computer space; Bushnell
K1 Nolan; Alcorn
K1 Allan; Baer
K1 Ralph
AB <p>The earliest digital games emerged out of laboratories and research centers in the 1960s and 1970s. The intertwined histories of Nolan Bushnell's Computer Space and Pong illustrate the transition from these "university games" to accessible entertainment and educational games as well as the complicated historical relationship among the arcade, computer, and videogames.</p>
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.53
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.53

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 20
TI Computer Hobbyists and the Gaming Industry in Finland
A1 Jaakko Suominen,
A1 Petri Saarikoski,
K1 History of computing
K1 digital games
K1 game journalism
K1 game industry
K1 Finland
K1 hobbyist subculture
AB <p>Since the 1950s, digital games in Finland have bridged gaps between professional users and the public as well as institutional and domestic environments. The early significance of Finland's 1970s and 1980s computer games hobbyist and hacker cultures is still evident: clear connections exist between the country's rich history of such subcultures and its modern international success in multimedia and mobile entertainment.</p>
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.39
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.39

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 34
TI Random and Raster: Display Technologies and the Development of Videogames
A1 Ian Bogost,
A1 Nick Montfort,
K1 Keywords: History of computing
K1 arcade games
K1 cathode-ray tube displays
K1 porting
K1 random scan displays
K1 raster scan displays
K1 vector graphics
K1 videogames
AB <p>Videogame developers have utilized many types of display technology, from oscilloscopes to Teletypes to high-definition LCD displays. Two significant early display technologies, raster scan and random scan CRTs, played a significant part in the history and evolution of videogames. A study of these technologies shows how the choice of one or the other, and the need to port games between the two, influenced game design and prompted developers to innovate.</p>
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.50
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.50

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 44
TI Context and Driving Forces in the Development of the Early Computer Game Nimbi
A1 Anker Helms Jorgensen,
K1 Keywords: history of computing
K1 computer game development
K1 Nim
K1 Nimbi
K1 Piet Hein
K1 Niels Ivar Bech
K1 Regnecentralen
K1 early 1960s
AB <p>The Danish computer company Regnecentralen developed a computer version of Piet Hein's game Nimbi, a variant of the ancient game Nim, in 1962 and 1963. Piet Hein envisioned computers playing against humans, while Regnecentralen hoped Nimbi would illustrate the potential of computers to the public. Although technologically successful, Nimbi never fulfilled its promise due to hardware constraints and a lack of organizational follow-up.</p>
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.41
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.41

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 54
TI Production Protection to Copy(right) Protection: From the 10NES to DVDs
A1 Casey O'Donnell,
K1 Copyright
K1 Nintendo
K1 DVD
K1 CSS
K1 DMCA
K1 10NES
K1 history of computing
K1 production protection
K1 videogame development
AB <p>Much of what modern digital rights management (DRM) systems attempt to accomplish was actually forcefully implemented on videogame consoles beginning with the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) and SEGA Genesis system in the early 1980s. Examining the links between modern DRM mechanisms and these early production and copy protection systems can help contextualize the future of media production and access.</p>
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.49
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.49

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 64
TI Magnavox and Intel: An Odyssey; The Early Days of the Arpanet
A1 Peter Salmon,
A1 Stanley Mazor,
A1 Peter T. Kirstein,
K1 Anecdotes
K1 Magnavox
K1 Intel
AB Today we have high-resolution videogames connected to our television sets, but let us reflect on a pioneering system in this field from 30 years ago. As an Intel applications engineer in 1976, my job (Mazor) was to find new customer applications for microcomputers and to translate customer needs to chip designers like Peter Salmon, who used our technology to solve customer problems. Analog integrated circuits (ICs) were prominently used in the entertainment products, but digital circuits were just making their debut particularly with digital readouts for time, station, and counters. In a sidebar, Peter T. Kirstein talks about the early days of the Arpanet, including the first use of the Arpanet by a head of state.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.35
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.35

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 68
TI Herbert F. Mataré
A1 Armand Van Dormael,
K1 Herbert F. Mataré
AB Physicist Herbert Franz Mataré has been doing groundbreaking work in the field of semiconductor research for more than 70 years. With Heinrich Welker in 1948, he developed the first functional European transistor. After that, his company Intermetall was the first to demonstrate a battery-operated transistor radio. Since then, he has continued his cutting-edge research in semiconductor, electronics, and solar-power technology. With more than 80 patents and numerous publications, his contributions to the field are only now being fully appreciated.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.38
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.38

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 74
TI Reviews
K1 Calculating a Natural World: Scientists
K1 Engineers
K1 and Computers During the Rise of U.S. Cold War Research
K1 Atushi Akera
K1 pluralism
K1 Memorable Ideas of a Computer School: The Life and Work of Antonin Svoboda
K1 George J. Klir
AB Two books are reviewed in this issue: Calculating a Natural World: Scientisits, Engineers, and Computers During the Rise of U.S. Cold War Research by Atushi Akera, and Memorable Ideas of a Computer School: The Life and Work of Antonin Svoboda, edited by George J. Klir.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.51
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.51

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 77
TI High (Plains) Tech
A1 Michael Geselowitz,
K1 local area networks
K1 Michael Geselowitz
K1 technology museums
K1 technological history
AB Although local technology museums around the world can indeed be hidden treasures, the movie treats this as a humorous incident showing the dullness of Nebraska. Of course, the filmmakers are being unfair not just to the social and cultural life in Lincoln and environs in general, but specifically to its wonderful museums, including the Sheldon Museum of Art and its Philip-Johnson-designed-gallery.at the University of Nebraska, and the Museum of Nebraska History. However, Annals readers will be more concerned if the value of the Woods Museum aside the filmmakers are giving short shrift to technological history in this important region. The answer, of course, is yes.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.48
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.48

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 83
TI The Purloined Mainframe: Hiding the History of Computing in Plain Sight
A1 John Laprise,
K1 Think Piece
K1 John Laprise
K1 purloined mainframe
K1 history of computing
AB The US federal government is immense. Executive branch departments are the size of large multinational corporations, with similar reach and power. Yet historians of computing looking at government have largely focused on elements in the Department of Defense not related to cryptography and NASA. Both of these organizations have a well-documented interest in computer technology. What about everyone else?
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.52
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.52

RT Journal Article
JF IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
YR 2009
VO 31
IS
SP 78
TI Events and Sightings
A1 Chigusa Kita,
K1 IPSJ Information Processing Technology Heritage Program
K1 Chigusa Kita
K1 Events and Sightings
AB The Information Processing Society of Japan (IPSJ) recently started the Information Processing Technology Heritage program to certify historical artifacts in order to promote the preservation of historical computers.
PB IEEE Computer Society, [URL:http://www.computer.org]
SN 1058-6180
LA English
DO 10.1109/MAHC.2009.43
LK http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MAHC.2009.43